Archives de Tag: désobéissance civile

From Latin America to Quebec: Violence as an Irreducible Political Debate

By Martin Breaugh, André Corten, Charles Deslandes, José Antonio Giménez Micó, Catherine Huart, Vanessa Molina and Ricardo Peñafiel*

Violence is frightening. For many it is enough to cause nightmares. The world is increasingly violent. For mass media, it is the violent “news” which grabs the most attention. Yes, the media magnify violence, but violence is nonetheless there. Since 2001, violence has become terrorism. Since 2001, violence has become evil itself: an evil whose very existence (or designation) triggers a self-protective reaction from the established order. But identifying violence is not so straightforward. It is also a way of interpreting reality: it’s legal yet violent, it’s illegal yet not necessarily violent! The student strike in Quebec this spring, its ensuing repression, and the pressure it generates — whether at the Palais des congrès in Montreal during the Premier’s speech to Plan Nord investors, in downtown Montreal during evening demonstrations, or in Victoriaville at the Liberal Party Congress — forces us to reassess what violence tells us.

Before discussing the so-called “fake” semantic debates surrounding the word “violence,” let’s take a look at the street-driven transformations that have taken place in Latin America since 2000. In the 1990s, Latin America entered its period of “democratic transition.” Legality and elections replaced dictatorships, summary arrests, torture and forced disappearances. But soon afterward the population began to realize that legality was the Trojan horse of neo-liberalism. Perhaps the most emblematic sign of this new awareness was the Bolivian “water war.” In the year 2000, Bolivia’s constitutionally elected president privatized the water supply. The street protests that erupted against it lasted four months. In the same constitutional context there followed two gas wars. Despite violent repression in the guise of legality, the street imposed another voice. The indigenous peoples no longer had to wear ties or be elected in order to be heard. The landless spoke up, blockading and occupying the cities. Violent repression was justified in the name of legality, whereas street violence questioned this very legality. The mobilization on the streets exposed the limits of representative democracy. But who exactly was calling all this into question and seeking to paralyze and outflank the established order that had replaced the dictatorships? None other than the plebs**, a mass movement, though not a monolithic one, one that cannot be interpreted as representing a class, lobby, or of any other special interest group. It was a heterogeneous movement whose unifying characteristic was its persistent exclusion from the social order, or, at the very least, its exclusion from the institutional structures and official channels where “decision-making takes place.”

In Quebec, as elsewhere in the modern industrialized West, we are not in a period of “democratic transition,” and any comparison with Latin America would be on shaky ground. Representative democracy is relatively well established here, especially in terms of electoral practices and civil rights. A certain kind of right to dissent has managed to make headway thanks to the on-going struggles of union, civic, and grass-roots groups and has led to domestic legislation and international treaties legalizing and enshrining the freedom of assembly and of speech. And yet, these “rights” — which have been granted in order to prevent the escalation of conflict that is part and parcel of any hierarchical society from getting beyond its control — are now being called into question by a government that refuses to give any legitimacy to extra-parliamentary forms of public expression. By stigmatizing acts of civil disobedience and peaceful protests as being violent, and by ignoring the protestors’ demands and trying to obstruct them by means of the violence of conservative legality, as if they were acts of sedition, the current government has endeavoured to render the students (as well as the broader group that supports them) in a plebeian position — sans titres, voiceless, without the legal right to speak out on the validity of the law or its procedures.

What is currently happening in Quebec can be seen as the beginning of a plebeian challenge to the legitimacy of the elected government’s decisions and of the State power that carries them out. Within the student movement and its numerous supporters one can see the characteristics of a heterogeneous popular movement that is attempting to overwhelm the established order, within which it has no place, neither in terms of its values or the structural rigidity which it attempts to impose. This Québécois movement calls into question the fact that the representative democracy with which it is familiar is being transformed input from outside, a transformation that can be characterized as the passage from the universal social welfare state to a system based on pay-as-you-go user fees. This phenomenon is not new, but has become generalized in tandem with an   increasingly inflexibility in the workings of representative democracy. The public in general is addressed as if it were separated into market segments.

In the street, ideas of legality and violence are currently being redefined. New sans titres are springing up. Students are not workers, it is said, and therefore don’t have the right to strike. It’s true they don’t negotiate the way unions do; instead, they put pressure on hierarchies, including those within their own organizations. The tribune of the plebs is contested: it is the street that speaks. In Bolivia, the “unofficial voices” have been identified as the indigenous peoples, just as in Quebec they are the students, but the issue has gone beyond immediate group interests and has become a questioning of the entire system. Beyond the issue of tuition fees, the students are gradually proving to be a secessionist force that refuses to be marginalized. They are challenging the monopoly on the definition of violence that the State accords itself. The violence which the CLASSE refuses to condemn — that which is carried out against symbols of the economic, structural, symbolic and repressive violence that they endure — now becomes a legitimate posture. At the very least, there is a struggle to establish its legitimacy. Such is the nature of a living political struggle, which is not pre-planned and which does not operate according to the pre-conceived parameters of conventional politics, limited to the negotiation of private interests according to predefined procedures.

Une version française de ce texte est aussi disponible.

También hay una versión en español de este artículo.

___________

Note :

* The signatories are researchers of GRIPAL (Research Group on Political Imaginaries in Latin America), research team which has just published a collective book on popular uprisings and spontaneous direct actions in Latin America: L’interpellation plébéienne en Amérique latine. Violence, actions directes et virage à gauche, Paris/Montréal, Karthala/PUQ, 2012.

** The name « plebs » refers to an experience, that of achieving political agency and assuming the dignity and responsibility of political action. Plebs is not the name of a social category or of an identity, but refers rather a political event of the highest order: the passage from a sub-political status to that of a full-fledged political subject. » Source: Martin Breaugh, The Plebeian Experience, New York: Columbia University Press, forthcoming.

Publicités

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Collectif

Le deuil de la démocratie libérale et la tentation autoritaire

Par Frédéric Mercure-Jolette | Cégep Saint-Laurent

Le néolibéralisme est en soi une proposition politique paradoxale qui peut être difficile à cerner. Pour plusieurs, le néolibéralisme est un mouvement visant la destruction de l’État, un modèle politique désirant le « moins d’État possible » et le « tout au marché » ; mais cette constatation oblitère trop souvent la tentation autoritaire à l’œuvre dans le néolibéralisme. La loi spéciale que s’apprête à adopter l’Assemblée nationale donne énormément de pouvoir au gouvernement du Québec, mais n’est pas moins néolibérale pour autant, bien au contraire. Elle manifeste parfaitement le paradoxe au cœur du néolibéralisme et la rupture que celui-ci veut incarner par rapport à la social-démocratie et au libéralisme classique. Parmi les grands reproches qu’ont adressés les néolibéraux, Hayek en tête, au libéralisme classique c’est sa naïveté envers le laissez-faire. La compétition économique doit, selon les néolibéraux, être formellement encadrée et encouragée par l’autorité étatique sinon la société risque de tomber dans le planisme et ainsi les individus perdront leurs libertés et la qualité des services et des produits offerts sera réduite. Ainsi, dans la perspective néolibérale, les institutions scolaires doivent être mises en compétition afin d’en assurer la qualité, mais aussi afin que les étudiants aient une liberté de choix. L’État ne doit pas intervenir directement dans l’organisation et la gestion de ces institutions, il est réduit, pourrait-on penser, à un partenaire subventionnaire. Or, il doit aussi s’assurer que ces institutions seront en compétition les unes avec les autres en énonçant un cadre formel et en empêchant les groupes de pression de « planifier » globalement des politiques publiques contraignant celles-ci. L’État a donc un rôle essentiel à jouer dans le modèle néolibéral. Wendy Brown, comme plusieurs autres, voit dans le néolibéralisme, un étatisme rampant. Elle affirme qu’« en assimilant l’État aux fonctions entrepreneuriales et dictatoriales, et en le repensant sur le modèle de l’entreprise, le néolibéralisme facilite et légitime l’accaparement étatique du pouvoir, inacceptable dans une culture ou selon une échelle de valeurs démocratiques. Il remplace les contraintes liées au procéduralisme [entendons ici la délibération démocratique] et à la responsabilité par les normes de la bonne gestion : l’efficacité ou la rentabilité. » (Les habits neufs de la politique mondiale, Paris, Les prairies ordinaires, 2007, p. 119)

Un des objectifs très clairs des néolibéraux est de déprendre l’État de l’emprise des mouvements sociaux. Or, pour cela, l’État doit être fort et autoritaire. Cela a amené certains, dont Philip Mirowski dans The Road From Mont Pèlerin (Harvard University Press, 2009, pp. 442-447), à tisser des liens entre le néolibéralisme de Hayek et la pensée conservatrice de Carl Schmitt. L’État social-démocrate, à l’écoute de la délibération publique et des revendications des différents mouvements sociaux est, dans les perspectives étonnamment correspondantes de Schmitt (conservatrice) et d’Hayek (néolibérale), tentaculaire et, surtout, faible. Il est un monstre asthénique parce qu’il est partout, intervient dans tout, et, ultimement, il est incapable de gouverner et de prendre des décisions neutres justement parce qu’il est à la solde des différents groupes d’intérêt antagonistes. Il faut donc redresser l’État, c’est-à-dire le retirer de la société civile. Le modèle néolibéral implique donc une dénégation des médiations délibératives qui avaient cours dans la démocratie libérale ou, autrement dit, une dépolitisation des forces sociales, dépolitisation qui ne peut être réalisée que par un État autoritaire. C’est exactement ce que tente de faire actuellement le gouvernement du Québec avec le mouvement étudiant. Le néolibéralisme vise à instituer un rapport unilatéral entre les individus (les institutions et les entreprises, tout cela fonctionne plus ou moins de la même manière) et l’autorité étatique (la loi et l’ordre).

Il ne faudrait cependant pas être dupe sur la manière de s’instituer du modèle néolibéral. Il utilise des brèches déjà existantes. On assiste actuellement à un spectacle parlementaire extraordinaire dans lequel le gouvernement du Québec fait jouer des procédures spéciales incluses dans notre régime politique supposément démocratique contre la social-démocratie. Le pire, c’est que le néolibéralisme semble profiter d’un danger interne à la désobéissance civile, soit l’émergence d’un sentiment d’insécurité dans une certaine frange de la population, et s’en sert pour justifier son autoritarisme. Bizarrement, il semble que les néolibéraux diabolisent les revendications social-démocrates de certains afin d’exacerber un climat de tension social et ainsi donner libre cours à leur tentation autoritaire anti-démocratique.

Wendy Brown fait, dans Les habits neufs de la politique mondiale (op. cit.), un constat qui peut apparaître plutôt banal, mais qui peut aussi, malgré tout, être fertile à la pensée politique actuelle : elle enjoint la gauche à faire le deuil de la démocratie libérale. De toute façon, affirme-t-elle, ce modèle, qui a souvent été vilipendé par la gauche (un peu marxisante) comme étant une idéologie de façade servant finalement à reproduire les inégalités et le mode de production capitaliste, la gauche ne l’a jamais aimé pleinement. Les revendications contre le modèle néolibéral fortement autoritaire ne doivent donc pas, dit elle, se faire au nom d’un modèle politique caduc, ou autrement dit, au nom de ce que le néolibéralisme nous ferait perdre. Le discours (nostalgique) de la perte tend à alimenter la tentation autoritaire en prenant souvent la forme d’une exigence de réappropriation du pouvoir souverain. Il faut plutôt démasquer et critiquer l’aspect autoritaire du pouvoir dans le modèle néolibéral, c’est-à-dire l’étatisme au cœur de celui-ci. La dérive autoritaire à laquelle nous assistons est inscrite à l’intérieur même du projet néolibéral, et c’est cela qu’il faut critiquer. La question devient alors : comment faire le deuil de la démocratie libérale sans tomber dans la tentation autoritaire ? Pour Wendy Brown, il faut œuvrer à une diversification et un plus grand partage du pouvoir. Mais encore, comment faire une telle chose ? Le problème de la stratégie politique reste béant. L’alternative de la désobéissance civile qui est sur la table apparaît tout à fait envisageable. Il faut toutefois être conscient du danger de nos actes, ces problèmes du deuil de la démocratie libérale et de la tentation autoritaire n’étaient-ils pas au cœur de la République de Weimar ?

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Frédéric Mercure-Jolette

De l’Amérique latine au Québec: la violence, un débat irréductiblement politique

Par Martin Breaugh, André Corten, Charles Deslandes, José Antonio Giménez Micó, Catherine Huart, Vanessa Molina et Ricardo Peñafiel*

La violence fait peur. Pour beaucoup, objet de cauchemars. Le monde est de plus en plus violent. Les médias sélectionnent l’information à partir d’un critère de violence « accrocheuse », ils la grossissent, mais elle est là. Depuis 2001, la violence est devenue terrorisme. Avec 2001, la violence, c’est le mal. Un mal dont la simple existence (ou désignation) appelle une réaction de l’ordre établi au nom de sa protection. Mais la violence est aussi un mode de lecture de la réalité : c’est légal et pourtant violent, c’est illégal et pourtant pas nécessairement violent ! La grève étudiante au Québec ce printemps, la répression qu’elle subit et la pression qu’elle fait – au Palais des congrès de Montréal lors du discours du Premier ministre aux investisseurs du Plan Nord, au centre-ville de la métropole lors des manifestations nocturnes, à Victoriaville lors du congrès général du Parti libéral – nous force à réévaluer ce que la violence nous dit.

Avant de revenir aux soi-disant « faux débats » de sémantique autour du mot « violence », regardons l’Amérique latine qui s’est transformée par les rues depuis 2000. Dans les années 1990, l’Amérique latine était entrée dans la « transition démocratique ». La légalité, les élections remplaçaient la dictature, les arrestations, la torture, les disparitions. Mais bientôt une conscience émerge dans la population : on se rend compte que la légalité est le cheval de Troie du néolibéralisme. Peut-être le signal le plus emblématique de cette conscience est la « guerre de l’eau » en Bolivie. On est en 2000, le pays a un président constitutionnel, celui-ci privatise l’eau. Durant quatre mois, la population proteste dans la rue. Toujours face à des gouvernements constitutionnels, à la guerre de l’eau succèdent deux guerres du gaz. Malgré la violence répressive couverte par la légalité, la rue impose une autre voix. Les indigènes ne doivent plus porter de cravates ou se faire élire pour se faire entendre. Les « sans titres » parlent, occupent et bloquent les villes. La violence répressive est justifiée par la légalité, la violence de la rue questionne cette légalité. La rue devient le lieu d’une mobilisation qui expose les limites de la démocratie représentative. Mais au fait, qui questionne, qui tente de paralyser l’ordre établi qui a remplacé les dictatures, qui essaie de le faire déborder pour se faire entendre ? C’est la plèbe**, une masse non-monolithique qui ne peut pas être lue en termes de classe, de lobby, ni d’autre groupe d’intérêt. Une masse hétérogène dont le critère de base est l’exclusion persistante de l’ordre social ou, du moins, l’exclusion des instances politiques institutionnelles qui le déterminent, l’exclusion des lieux officiels où « se prennent les décisions ».

Au Québec, comme ailleurs dans l’Occident moderne industrialisé, on n’en est pas à la « transition démocratique » : toute comparaison risque d’être bancale. La démocratie représentative y est relativement bien implantée ; sur le plan de la culture électorale et des droits civiques notamment. Un certain droit à la dissidence a fini par se frayer un chemin en fonction de luttes syndicales, populaires et civiques d’ici et d’ailleurs, au point de se traduire jusque dans les législations nationales et les traités internationaux, légalisant et encadrant les droits d’association et d’expression. Pourtant, ces « droits » – qui ont été concédés pour empêcher que la conflictualité inhérente à toute société hiérarchisée ait à se rendre à des degrés ultimes – se voient aujourd’hui remis en question par un gouvernement qui refuse de reconnaître une quelconque légitimité aux formes extra-parlementaires d’expression publique. Stigmatisant comme violents les actes de désobéissance civile autant que les manifestations dans l’ensemble pacifiques, ignorant leurs interpellations ou lançant sur eux une violence conservatrice du droit, comme s’il s’agissait d’actes de sédition, l’actuel gouvernement place les étudiants (de même qu’un ensemble beaucoup plus large les appuyant) dans une position de « plèbe », de sans voix, de sans titres pour statuer sur le bien-fondé de la loi ou de sa procédure.

Ce qui se produit actuellement au Québec peut ainsi être lu comme l’embryon d’une remise en question plébéienne de la légitimité des décisions prises par le gouvernement élu et, tout autant, de la force d’État qui les applique. Dans le mouvement étudiant et les nombreux appuis qu’il récolte, on peut voir les traits de cette plèbe hétérogène qui tente de faire déborder l’ordre dans lequel elle ne trouve pas de place, dans lequel elle ne se reconnaît pas, ni sur le plan des valeurs, ni sur le plan de la rigidité des procédures qu’on tente de lui imposer. Cette plèbe québécoise remet en cause le fait que la démocratie représentative qu’elle connaît, ou souhaite, se transforme sans qu’elle n’ait à dire mot, passant d’un État social à un système généralisé d’utilisateurs payeurs. Le phénomène ne date pas d’aujourd’hui, mais se généralise en rigidifiant le fonctionnement de la démocratie représentative. On s’adresse au public comme à un marché compartimenté.

Dans la rue, on redéfinit la légalité et la violence. De nouveaux « sans titre » surgissent. Les étudiants ne sont pas des travailleurs, dit-on : ils n’ont pas droit à la grève. En effet, ils ne négocient pas comme les syndicats ; ils font pression sur les hiérarchies y compris à l’intérieur de leur propre organisation. La figure du tribun est contestée : c’est la rue qui parle. En Bolivie, les « sans titre » ont été identifiés aux indigènes, comme au Québec aux étudiants, mais la question déborde des intérêts immédiats du groupe qui devient le symbole de la remise en question d’un système. Tout doucement, au-delà de la question des frais de scolarité, les étudiants se dévoilent comme force de sécession refusant d’être marginale. Ils contestent le monopole que l’État s’accorde pour définir la violence. La violence que la CLASSE refuse de condamner, celle portée contre des symboles de la violence économique, structurelle, symbolique et répressive qu’ils subissent, se présente alors comme légitime. Du moins, elle fait l’objet d’une lutte pour l’établissement de sa légitimité. Et c’est là une lutte politique vivante, qui s’invente au fur et à mesure où elle se fait – qui ne se limite pas, tel que le veut la politique convenue, à négocier des intérêts privés selon des procédures prédéfinies.

También hay una versión en español de este artículo.

There is also an English version of this article.

___________

Note :

* Les auteurs, chercheurs du GRIPAL (Groupe de recherche sur les imaginaires politiques en Amérique latine), ont collaboré à l’écriture d’un ouvrage sur les soulèvements populaires et les actions directes spontanées en Amérique latine : L’interpellation plébéienne en Amérique latine. Violence, actions directes et virage à gauche, Paris/Montréal, Karthala/PUQ, 2012.

** Le terme « plèbe » réfère à une expérience qui consiste à réaliser un projet politique et à assumer la dignité et la responsabilité de l’action politique. « Plèbe » ne désigne ni une catégorie sociale, ni une identité, mais réfère à un événement politique de la plus grande importance : le passage d’un statut infrapolitique à celui de sujet politique dans toute sa plénitude. (Source : Martin Breaugh, The Plebeian Experience, New York : Columbia University Press, sous presse.)

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Collectif

De Latinoamérica a Quebec: la violencia, un debate irreductiblemente político

Por Martin Breaugh, André Corten, Charles Deslandes, José Antonio Giménez Micó, Catherine Huart, Vanessa Molina y Ricardo Peñafiel*

La violencia da miedo; para mucha gente, es como una especie de pesadilla. El mundo es cada vez más violento. Los medios seleccionan la información a partir de un criterio de violencia “atractiva”, la magnifican, pero ahí está. Desde 2001, la violencia se ha convertido en terrorismo. Desde 2001, la violencia es el mal. Un mal cuya simple existencia (o designación) reclama una reacción del orden establecido en nombre de su protección. Pero la violencia también es un modo de lectura de la realidad: ¡es legal y sin embargo violento, es ilegal pero no necesariamente violento! La huelga estudiantil actual en Quebec nos lleva a reevaluar lo que la violencia dice.

Antes de volver a los presuntos falsos debates de semántica en torno a la palabra “violencia”, observemos Latinoamérica, que se ha transformado desde las calles a partir del año 2000. En los años 1990, América Latina se encuentra en un período de “transición democrática”. La legalidad y las elecciones reemplazan las dictaduras, las detenciones, la tortura y las desapariciones. Pero una consciencia va emergiendo en la población: la legalidad es también un caballo de Troya del neoliberalismo. Quizá la señal más emblemática de esta consciencia es la “guerra del agua” en Bolivia. Nos encontramos en 2000, el país tiene un presidente constitucional, éste privatiza el agua. Durante cuatro meses, la población protesta en la calle. Siempre en contextos de gobierno constitucional, a la guerra del agua suceden dos guerras del gas. A pesar de la violencia represiva cubierta por la legalidad, la calle impone otra voz. Los indígenas ya no deben ponerse corbatas o ser elegidos para hacerse oír. Los “sin títulos” hablan, ocupan y bloquean las ciudades. La violencia represiva se justifica por la legalidad, la violencia de la calle cuestiona esta legalidad. La calle se convierte en el lugar de una movilización que expone los límites de la democracia representativa. Pero de hecho, ¿quién cuestiona, quién intenta paralizar el orden establecido que ha reemplazado a las dictaduras, quién trata de hacer que este orden se desborde para hacerse oír? Se trata de la plebe**, una masa no monolítica que ya no puede ser leída en términos de clase, de lobby ni de ningún otro grupo de interés. Una masa heterogénea cuyo criterio de base es su exclusión persistente del orden social o, al menos, su exclusión de las instancias políticas institucionales que lo determinan, su exclusión de los lugares oficiales donde “se toman las decisiones”.

En Quebec, como en otros lugares del Occidente moderno industrializado, no nos encontramos en ninguna “transición democrática”: la democracia representativa está relativamente bien implantada, sobre todo por lo que respecta a la cultura electoral y a los derechos cívicos. Aquí y allá, cierto derecho a la disidencia se ha ido abriendo camino en función de luchas sindicales, populares y cívicas, hasta el punto de traducirse en las legislaciones nacionales y en los tratados internacionales, que legalizan y delimitan los derechos de asociación y de expresión. Sin embargo, estos “derechos” –que han sido concedidos para impedir que la conflictividad inherente a cualquier sociedad jerarquizada llegue a su paroxismo– son hoy impugnados por un gobierno que se niega a reconocer la más mínima legitimidad a las formas extraparlamentarias de expresión pública. Estigmatizando como violentos los actos de desobediencia civil así como las manifestaciones, en conjunto pacíficas; ignorando sus interpelaciones o abalanzándose sobre éstas como si de actos de sedición se tratara, una violencia conservadora basada en el derecho, el gobierno actual coloca a los estudiantes (así como al conjunto mucho más amplio que los apoya) en una posición de “plebe”, de sin voz, de sin títulos para establecer lo bien fundado de la ley o de su procedimiento.

Lo que se produce actualmente en Quebec puede así ser leído como el embrión de un cuestionamiento plebeyo de la legitimidad de las decisiones tomadas por el gobierno electo, así como de la fuerza de Estado que las aplica. En el movimiento estudiantil y los numerosos apoyos que recibe, se pueden apreciar los rasgos de esta plebe heterogénea que intenta hacer que desborde un orden en el cual no encuentra su lugar, en el cual no se reconoce, ni en el plano de los valores ni en el de la rigidez de procedimientos que intenta imponerle. Esta plebe quebequense no acepta que, sin que se le permita siquiera abrir la boca, esta democracia representativa que conoce o desea se transforme de un Estado social a un sistema generalizado de usuarios que pagan por los servicios que reciben [utilisateurs-payeurs]. El fenómeno no es nuevo, pero se generaliza a medida que el funcionamiento de la democracia representativa se va volviendo cada vez más rígido y el público se va convirtiendo en un mercado separado en compartimentos [compartimenté].

En la calle se redefine la legalidad y la violencia. Emergen nuevos “sin títulos”. Se dice que los estudiantes no son trabajadores: no tienen derecho a la huelga. En efecto, no negocian como lo hacen los sindicatos; presionan a las jerarquías, incluidas las existentes en el interior de su propia organización. Se contesta la figura del tribuno: quien habla es la calle. En Bolivia, los “sin títulos” han sido identificados a los indígenas, a los obreros, a los mineros, en Quebec a los estudiantes, pero la cuestión desborda los intereses inmediatos del grupo, que se transforma en el símbolo del cuestionamiento de todo un sistema. Tranquilamente, más allá de la cuestión de las tasas académicas, los estudiantes se desvelan como fuerza de secesión que se niega a ser marginal. Los estudiantes contestan el monopolio que el Estado se concede para definir la violencia. La violencia que la CLASSE se niega a condenar, la que se dirige contra los símbolos de la violencia económica, estructural, simbólica y represiva que sufren, se presenta entonces como legítima; o, al menos, es el objeto de una lucha por el establecimiento de su legitimidad. Se trata de una lucha política viva, que se va inventando a medida que se va haciendo: que no se limita, como lo quisiera la política al uso, a negociar intereses privados según procedimientos predefinidos.

Une version française de ce texte est aussi disponible.

There is also an English version of this article.

___________

Note :

* Los autores, investigadores del Grupo de Investigación sobre los Imaginarios Políticos en América Latina (GRIPAL, por sus siglas en francés), han colaborado en la redacción de una obra sobre los levantamientos populares y las acciones directas espontáneas en Latinoamérica: L’interpellation plébéienne en Amérique latine. Violence, actions directes et virage à gauche, Paris/Montréal, Karthala/PUQ, 2012.

** El término “plebe” se refiere a una experiencia que consiste en realizar un proyecto político y en asumir la dignidad y responsabilidad de la acción política. “Plebe” no designa una categoría social o una identidad, sino que más bien se refiere a un evento político del más alto grado: el paso de un estatus infrapolítico al de un sujeto político en toda su plenitud. (Fuente: Martin Breaugh, The Plebeian Experience, New York: Columbia University Press, en prensa.)

Poster un commentaire

Classé dans Collectif